Category: Essays by Ming Zhen Shakya

The White Birds

What have you tried? What drives your practice? These two questions underly Ming Zhen’s tale of Kanin. He exemplifies some of the struggle with pride and greed which turns into debilitating anger. Find out what happens to him in Ming Zhen’s White Birds.

Opowieść 31 – Człowiek, który zdołał pozostać.

Przypowieść o tym jak czasami można starać się „za bardzo” i przez to usztywnić się oraz zablokować swobodny przebieg sytuacji. Dowiemy się z niej jak – nieco się tylko rozluźniając i nabierając trochę pokory – możemy bez większego wysiłku odnaleźć harmonię i właściwy sens okoliczności.

Essence and Expectations: Digging for the Gold of Insight

In this complex. exquisite essay Ming Zhen leads us through the fine workings of insight as if we are obliged to ascertain the same truths and joys of Archimedes discovery of measuring the cheap copper from gold. This essay requires concentration, effort and skill….all fine tools of the spiritual adept.

Dharma i Karma I

Ming Zhen Shakya (Author) Fa Yin (Translator) Żadne inne słowa z leksykalnego magazynu buddyzmu nie grzmią równie donośnie co Dharma […]

A Quick Course in Zen Theology

Save by a few things, there is no issue more confusing than Buddhist Theology. Except that more people tend to feel able to debate about it that as the case of string theory. In this exquisite essay, Ming Zhen Shakya expounds a summary of the theology behind our Path.

Sudden School Zen and Gradual School Zen

Beginners in the Path sometimes get confused when reading different Zen accounts. Usually, they get contradictory statements… In “Sudden School and Gradual School”, Ming Zhen Shakya explains synthesizes the approachs of both schools.

Hagakure (#8)

Homoerotic activity was practiced in many ancient militaristic cultures, especially the Samurai. I helped to balance the exclusive effeminate maternal upbringing a boy knew before he was sent to military school. It substituted strong, life-saving warriors for the bunnies and foxes of childhood folklore. It taught him self-reliance and teamwork, and established the man-to-man communication that was lacked in herertosexual relationships

Hagakure (#7)

We all know the dry mouth that comes with fear. We have only to stand up before a group to give a speech in order to find our mouths go dry and our lips stick to our teeth. But fear means more than a dry mouth to a Samurai. There is a secret in spit to the seasoned warrior.

The Journey Home

At the suggestion of the Ven. Yao Xiang, Ming Zhen watched the YouTube conversation in which an orthodox Catholic priest traces his life from drugs and motorcycles to his present ministry. His recommendations are somewhat different from the Zen prescription, which Ming Zhen responds to in her essay.

Hagakure (#6)

It is never too late to adopt the Samurai Way of Life, to abandon old selfish ways, to embrace new principles, and to devote one’s life to being loyal to those principles. Especially after a surviving a critical challenge to one’s existence, we experience a great need to find a better way of living, a code to live by that will impart indomitability to us. We are done with being weak. In her review of Jim Jarmusch’s film Ghost Dog, Ming Zhen Shakya shows one man’s conversion to the discipline of righteous beliefs.

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